Who can contribute to the ira?

Anyone with earned income can open an IRA and contribute to it, including people who have a 401 (k) account through an employer. The only limitation is the combined amount you can contribute to your retirement accounts in a single year and, at the same time, get tax benefits.

Who can contribute to the ira?

Anyone with earned income can open an IRA and contribute to it, including people who have a 401 (k) account through an employer. The only limitation is the combined amount you can contribute to your retirement accounts in a single year and, at the same time, get tax benefits. It depends on the type of IRA you are. Almost anyone can contribute to a traditional IRA, as long as you (or your spouse) receive taxable income and are younger than 70 and a half years old.

However, your contributions are tax-deductible only if you meet certain requirements. For more information on those requirements, see Who can contribute to a traditional IRA? There are no income limits for traditional IRAS1, however, there are income limits for tax-deductible contributions. Yes, you can contribute to an IRA for a non-working unemployed spouse with whom you file a joint return, but your total combined contribution cannot exceed your joint taxable income or double the annual IRA limit, whichever is lower. If you don't have taxable compensation, but you file a joint return with a spouse who earns income, you can open an IRA in your name and make contributions through a spousal IRA.

Once you've maximized the subsidy, you can deposit additional amounts into a Roth IRA or a traditional IRA (even if the contributions are not deductible). However, you can still contribute to a Roth IRA and make cumulative contributions to a Roth or traditional IRA, regardless of your age.